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Giant Squid | National Geographic

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In ancient Egypt, Akhenaten was a god, Hawass explained. The poems said of him, 'you are the man, and you are the woman,' so artists put the picture of a man and a woman in his body.

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Giant squid, along with their cousin, the colossal squid, have the largest eyes in the animal kingdom, measuring some 65 inches in diameter. These massive organs allow them to detect objects in the lightless depths where most other animals would see nothing.

They maneuver their massive bodies with fins that seem diminutive for their size. They use their funnel as a propulsion system, drawing water into the mantle, or main part of the body, and forcing it out the back.

The report is the first DNA study ever conducted with ancient Egyptian royal mummies. It apparently solves several mysteries surrounding King Tut, including how he died and who his parents were.

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Until now the best guesses as to how King Tut died have included a hunting accident , a blood infection, a blow to the head, and poisoning.

The new study, published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association , marks the first time the Egyptian government has allowed genetic studies to be performed using royal mummies.

Like other squid species, they have eight arms and two longer feeding tentacles that help them bring food to their beak-like mouths. Their diet likely consists of fish, shrimp, and other squid, and some suggest they might even attack and eat small whales.